CONTENTS

F E A T U R E S
Pitt Magazine
September, 1994
OUR BODIES, OUR CELLS
From sickle cell anemia to organ transplants to diabetes, Pitt researcher Suzanne Ildstad has opened new avenues for treatment by finding ways to make our cells at home....by Laura Shefler

Leaves of Grass

Pitt's influence on Oakland
and beyond.
THE SWING OF THINGS
A young Irish girl comes to understand that no matter how carefully we try to fall just right, our paths remain unpredictable. A short story by Jennifer C Cornell, this year's winner of the drew Heinz Literature Prize.
LEAVES OF GRASS
The University is ore than classrooms and football fields. Pitt's influence and impact reach far beyond the campus....by Mark Collins
D E P A R T M E N T S

The Swing of Things
What happens when
a stuntman falls.
4200 FIFTH AVENUE
On the lawn

LETTERS
Our readers write

TUCK SHOP
Snack-sized stories

TAKE FIVE
Ladder Up!

THE COMMONS ROOM
Two wheeled police...Flower power
...Around the cornerstone

CLASSES YOU MAY
HAVE MISSED

Akiko Hashimoto on Aging in Japan

HEALTH
Early Recovery....by Marc Hopkins

HOMECOMING
Calandar...Class Notes and Spotlights...Alumni Notebook....Edited by Sally Neiser

42ND FLOOR
Tin-Can Charlie...by Tommy Ehrbar

C O N T R I B U T O R S
Terry Clark.--("LEaves of Grass") The Pittsburgh based photographer takes pictures for the New York Times and Inc. Magazine. As a corporate photographer with a particular interest in engineering, he spends a lot of time "hanging off of oil rigs." HE makes his altered polaroid photographs "for fun and therapy" by manipulating the emulsion while the picture is still developing.
Robert Meganck.--("The Swing of Things") Robert Meganck is an illustrator and designer based in Richmond, Virginia. His work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times and in Northeast and Business Atlanta magazines. He is a founding partner of Communication Design, Inc., and professor of Communication Arts and Design at Virginia Commonwealth University.
ON THE COVER: Medical Researcher Suzanne Ildstad hopes to revolutionize bone marrow transplantation. Photo by Michael Ray.