Pitt Magazine Homepage Table of Contents

HOMECOMING
ARTS AND SCIENCES
BUSINESS
EDUCATION
ENGINEERING
HEALTH AND REHABILITATION SCIENCES
LAW
LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
MEDICINE
NURSING
PHARMACY
PUBLIC HEALTH
PUBLIC AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
SOCIAL WORK



WELL JUDGED
SPANNING THE DECADES
GOING STRONG
IN MEMORIAM

THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AERO TEAM -- THE OWL, 1922

ALUMNI NOTEBOOK . . .

ARTS AND SCIENCES

George W. Albee, '49, '47, professor emeritus at the University of Vermont, has been honored with an endowed lectureship by the World Federation for Mental Health. The first Albee lecture was given in Dublin, Ireland, in August 1995. George A. Brinsko, '50, has received the Emerson Medal from the Water Environment Federation for his contributions to the wastewater collection and treatment industry. W. Carver Collins, '50, of Kingston, Pennsylvania, was honored recently with Wyoming Seminary's Frances and Louis Maslow Award for teaching excellence. In addition to teaching English literature and writing courses, he is also head of the seminary's drama program. Ernest Sosa, '65, '63, who has taught philosophy at Brown University since 1964, is the Donald J. Cowling Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. Paul Zolbrod, '67, '62, '58, professor emeritus of English at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania, and now living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, reports: "I have done interesting work in the field of native American poetry, especially among the Navajo. In my publications I explain how my Pittsburgh boyhood prepared me for my research among the Navajo." George McKenzie, '69, writes: "[My wife and I] recently opened our fourth Subway Restaurant in San Antonio. I also founded a consulting firm to help executives improve their presentation skills." McKenzie was a former professional baseball player and TV sportscaster, winning the "Best Sportscast in Texas" award three times. Mary Jane Trunzo, '72, has been named Outstanding Professional in the State of Arizona by the Arizona Head Injury Foundation. Trunzo is clinical director for the Arizona Institute for Communication and Cognitive Disorders. Melanie Spewock, '75, says, "[After graduation], I drifted north and west to Minneapolis where I'm growing old gracefully. I like Pitt Magazine a lot." Francis Terrell, '75, '72, recently earned promotion to professor of psychology at the University of North Texas. Larry Platt, '76, writes that he recently joined the Washington, DC, office of Kirkpatrick and Lockhart as a partner. Steven Vance, '79, says he's in the performance business in Pittsburgh with Steven Vance Strolling Violins. "I've performed for former first lady Barbara Bush, for Governor Tom Ridge's 50th birthday party, and for Coach Johnny Majors, who asked me to play 'The Impossible Dream' as the theme for his second season." Caroline Woolf, '82, has completed a one-year graduate certificate from the Program for Women in Politics and Government at UMass Boston. Lisa Dvorchak, '84, is vice president of marketing for AIM (USA), an automatic data collection trade association in Pittsburgh. Christopher Bosso, '85, '80, has been named chair of the Northeastern University political science department. Yvonne Steele Hudson, '89, of Cliffside Park, New Jersey, and publications manager for the Yeshiva University alumni magazine, reports: "I was elected vice president for student affairs of New York Women in Communications. I still book and perform my Theatre Arts master's thesis project 'Mrs. Shakespeare,' a one-woman show about Anne Hathaway and Will S." Russell Leigh Moses, '89, '84, writes that, for the past three years, he has been professor of international relations at the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies at Nanjing University in China. ["I've ] traveled widely in Asia and Russia, and [my] book, Freeing the Hostages, about the Iran hostage crisis will be published in the spring of 1996 by the University of Pittsburgh Press." Daniel Thayer, '92, writes that he has taken a teaching job in Raleigh, North Carolina, and that he is also the assistant high school soccer coach. Scott Abel, '93, is account executive with the Washington Capitals of the National Hockey League. Bruce Boul, '93, a writer for Allegheny General Hospital's communications department, says, "It takes more than a college degree to land a job in PR...internships, volunteer work, and freelancing really pay off." Boul interned at the hospital during his senior year and also wrote public relations ad campaigns for a local nonprofit group. Greg McLauchlin, '93, a first-year medical student, has been chosen as one of eight presidential scholars at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Christopher Shellito, '94, reports that he is in his second year of law school in Akron, Ohio.

BUSINESS

Barbara Branch, '79, Arts and Sciences '72, of Charlotte, North Carolina, was elected to the Chautauqua Institution Board of Trustees. Douglas J. Miller, '87, has been promoted to vice president at The Genix Group. He retains his title of general manager of North Carolina Operations at Genix's Charlotte facility. Andrew Hannah, '92, is senior manager in the audit and accounting department of Deloitte & Touche LLP in Pittsburgh. Dennis Prado, '95, of Stratford, Connecticut, is manager for Price Waterhouse LLP.

EDUCATION

Alice Fox, '49, of New Oxford, Pennsylvania, says, "I have been honored by the National Grange and the Pennsylvania State Grange for 65 continuous years of membership. I joined the Somerset Grange on September 30, 1930, and am now an active grange member in Hanover, Pennsylvania." A. Richard Pitcock, '69, assistant superintendent at the Mt. Lebanon (Pennsylvania) School District, is president of the American Association of School Personnel Administrators. Rosario Semplice, '73, was recently featured with his son-in-law, a graphics instructor in Pittsburgh, in a two-person art show entitled "Some Things I Think." Judy Maruffi, '74, administrative assistant at Bradley Memorial Hospital in New Hampshire and president/CEO of a private consulting firm, is working toward a graduate degree at Antioch New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire. J. Robert Quatroche, '75, vice president for institutional advancement at Southern Illinois University, personally welcomed President Bill Clinton to the university when he recently addressed ten thousand students, faculty, alumni, and community representatives. Sharon Wallach, '80, Arts and Sciences '79, serves as cantor for the Adat Chaim congregation in Reisterstown, Maryland. Lori Hunter, '94, Engineering '80, is assistant dean of Academic Excellence Programs and director of the Office of Minority Engineering Programs at Syracuse University's L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.

ENGINEERING

Wally L. Luthy, '55, of Kingwood, Texas, president and general manager of Mobil Natural Gas Company, has retired after 40 years of service. His retirement plans include serving on several boards of directors and playing more golf. During his student days, Luthy was manager of the Pitt football team. Always a great Pitt supporter, he is a member of the Greater Houston Pitt Club. Donald P. Davis, '60, now employed by Caparo Steel in Highland Park, Illinois, writes to say he has spent 35 years in the steel industry. Harvey Klein, '62, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, writes that he has retired from Ford Motor Company after 33 years. Klein, who is presently doing consulting work, says he led a team from the United States, England, and Germany in designing a new engine for the Ranger truck. The truck received 4 Wheel & Off Road magazine's "Truck of the Year" award. Mary Grace Lackey Burke, '76, has been elected a fellow of the American Society for Metals. Burke, of Pittsburgh, is a fellow scientist at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Ruthann Omer, '83, president of Gateway Engineers in Pittsburgh, is the president of the Society of Women Engineers for 1995-96. Coleen Hart, '86, serves on the board of directors for the Society of Women Engineers (1995-97), representing members in Kentucky, Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. She is an environmental control engineer for US Steel's Clairton Works.

HEALTH AND REHABILITATION SCIENCES

Jason Urbani, '91, graduated from the Pennsylvania State Police Academy and is now a Pennsylvania state trooper living in Butler, Pennsylvania. Rick Schneider, '92, working for Home Call in Westminster, Maryland, does rehabilitation and home care, including case management, in a rural setting.

LAW

John S. Meyer, '65, was appointed by the governor of California to serve as a judge in the San Diego County Superior Court. Michael Berlin, '74, has become vice president and general counsel to Private Asset Management in San Diego, California, after 20 years of private practice. Paula Campbell, '86, has been named trial counsel for The Harleysville Insurance Companies' Norristown, Pennsylvania, litigation office. Patricia Monahan, '90, has joined Marshall, Dennehey, Warner, Coleman & Goggin as an associate in their Pittsburgh office.

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

John G. Lovelace, '83, has been named director of the mental retardation program at St. Francis Medical Center in Pittsburgh. Karen Draut Long, '88, of Shaker Heights, Ohio, is the head of the foreign literature department at the Cleveland Public Library. "We have the largest collection of foreign books in a public library in Ohio," she writes, circulating 11,000 books monthly in 45 languages. Michael Macedonia, '89, is vice president of the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics in Providence, Rhode Island. Timothy Gaus, '91, is technical librarian at Harbison-Walker Refractories' Garber Research Facility in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania. Gaus had been librarian for the Pitt School of Education's Computer and Curriculum Inquiry Center. Megan Hartman, '94, is scientific programmer/analyst with Lockheed Martin in Virginia. Lora Koehler, '94, children's librarian at the Salt Lake City Public Library, has written Internet, part of the New True Books series. Joel Berger, '96, is a microcomputer specialist in Pittsburgh's Robert Morris College computer center.

MEDICINE

William W. Young, '70, associate professor at the Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, received an award from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for an educational video he produced with Dartmouth colleagues. Gilmore Sanes, '70, has retired from clinical practice and has accepted a position as medical director at Healthsource Provident Administrators, Inc., in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Bruce M. Coull, '72, Engineering '68, '67, has been appointed professor and head of the department of neurology at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

NURSING

Mary Halley Huch, '74, is a professor at the University of Southern Mississippi School of Nursing and has just completed an adult/geriatric nurse practitioner program. She says, "Each issue of Pitt Magazine is read from cover to cover. Keeps me in touch with the University and Pittsburgh." Linda Nyberg Ferree, '80, has been chosen to become "a face on the wall" in the Centennial Olympic Wall Contest in Atlanta. The mural of faces will welcome people to the 1996 Summer Olympics. Her husband, Jim (Engineering '80), writes that Linda was nominated for this honor by the Gwinnett County Department of Family and Children Services for her volunteer work. "[We] have been foster parents for four-and-a-half years and have cared for 23 (and counting) children in state custody." They also have three children of their own. Linda, who, until recently, was employed as a family advocate with the county mental health services, has received many honors for her volunteer activities in the Atlanta area. Jim is project manager for Siemens Energy and Automation.

PHARMACY

Stephen Young, '62, president of St. Michael Hospital in Milwaukee, is 1996 chairman-elect of the Wisconsin Hospital Association.

PUBLIC HEALTH

Kenneth Knight, '73, a director with the Goleta (California) West Sanitary District, received a certificate of completion in Special District Board Management for professionalism and commitment to continuing education. Maryann Fralic, '82, Nursing '73, vice president for nursing at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, will jointly oversee The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing, a program to share Hopkins' expertise and educational programs with health care providers worldwide. Robin Zernich Mohr, '84, is chief executive officer at St. Francis Central Hospital in Pittsburgh. She is also senior vice president for the St. Francis Health System.

PUBLIC AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Lawrence S. Draghi, '82, Business '81, Arts and Sciences '79, of Pittsburgh, has been named director of the health and welfare benefits services group at the Todd Organization, Inc. Theophilas C. Gemelas, '88, Arts and Sciences '85, has been appointed deputy director of international programs at the Center for Security Strategies and Operations of Techmatics, Inc. Jeffrey Perkins, '91, has been awarded a second $1 million grant from Housing and Urban Development for YouthBuild Pittsburgh. YouthBuild Pittsburgh is a program developed to train economically disadvantaged youth in the housing construction trades while they receive remedial education. Perkins, who is a GSPIA doctoral student, received the competitive million dollar grants in both 1995 and 1996.

SOCIAL WORK

James Bernardo, '76, of Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania, is regional operations director for Presbyterian Homes, Inc.'s eastern division.

WELL JUDGED
John G. Brosky (Law '49, Arts and Sciences '42) has something special to celebrate this year. Now a senior judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania, he will mark his fortieth year on the bench.

"I guess it's always been my life to serve," Brosky says. "My view has always been that the good Lord gave me some talents and abilities not to be used for selfish purposes. If I can help others and they call on me, I don't want to miss that opportunity."

For this generosity of spirit, Brosky has received a great deal of recognition. In 1995, for his many contributions to the Western Pennsylvania area, he was awarded two honors that were particularly meaningful.

He was selected as the "1994 Man of the Year in Law and Government" by Vectors/Pittsburgh, a professional organization of business and community leaders, a distinction much appreciated. However, perhaps the greatest honor came when August 24, 1995, was declared "General John G. Brosky Day" in Allegheny County by the Board of County Commissioners. That day, Brosky, a former Air National Guard major general, received the Pride of Pennsylvania Award for his work as chairman of the Western Pennsylvania Coalition, a group that worked to save a local Air Force Reserve wing and an Army support center.

The judge's ongoing community involvement also includes Pitt. An active alumnus for 54 years, he serves on the law school's Board of Visitors and participates in University activities whenever he can. In fact, his three children, John, Carol, and David, are all Pitt grads.

Brosky, who lives in Carnegie, Pennsylvania, with his wife, Rose, has another claim to fame: He is an accomplished horseshoe pitcher, coming in seventh recently in the world championships.--David W. Matta



SPANNING THE DECADES

Back in 1930, when Michael A. Gross was a civil engineering student, he was involved in a senior project to measure the effect of wind on the Cathedral of Learning. Gross says several ways of measuring the building's swing were considered, but the method chosen consisted, in principle, of simply looking up at a target fastened in the center of one of the high-rise elevator shafts on the 36th floor and actually watching the building sway.

"We had to lie on our backs to sight up the elevator shaft to read the target," Gross remembers. "We placed an anemometer on top of the building's water tank to measure wind velocity and direction, and when the device malfunctioned, we had to climb a skinny ladder at night. At that time, the building had not been completely enclosed, so the climb could be precarious." In the end, test results showed that although a light gust of wind could sometimes move the building farther than a strong breeze, Cathedral movements follow no set pattern.

More recently, Gross, an amateur artist, presented a painting to Pitt's civil engineering department. "I often visit the Southwest where I travel to locations of rugged beauty," he says. "A couple of years ago, near Lake Powell in Utah, I photographed the greatest natural bridge in the world, known as the 'Rainbow Bridge,' one of nature's civil engineering wonders."

The bridge, which spans 270 feet and rises to a height of 290 feet, became the subject of an oil painting by Gross that now hangs in the offices on the ninth floor of Benedum Hall.

Gross, who lives in Pittsburgh, enjoyed a 65-year career as a civil engineer. He has been a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and was recently presented a special award for service to the organization.--Sally Neiser



GOING STRONG

Tucked away in the mountains of West Virginia lies the little town of Kingwood, home to the University's oldest known living alumna. Gertrude Coffman Halbritter (Arts and Sciences '21) says she fell in love with the little West Virginia community when she fell in love with her husband: "I always told him I liked the people here so well, I married him so I could stay."

After graduating from Pitt, Halbritter, a native Pittsburgher, heard about a teaching job in West Virginia that paid $150 a month. "Since Pennsylvania only paid $135, I applied and they took me." Halbritter taught for a number of years until her husband offered her a deal she couldn't turn down.

"He said he'd buy me a car if I would resign, so I was the first woman in the county to have a car of her own." Today, at 95, Halbritter is still driving. She also plays bridge, but only on what she calls her day off. The other days she's busy volunteering at the local hospital, making blankets for the gift shop, brewing coffee for Sunday church services, and until recently, taking charge of the dining room for the annual Kingwood Buckwheat Festival. She also makes it a point to keep up-to-date on current books, reading from the recommended list put out by West Virginia University.

Talking about her University days, Halbritter remembers, "We didn't have dorms, so I stayed at the Kappa Alpha Theta house. There was no Pitt Stadium then--we went to football games at Forbes Field. Trees Gym was there, but of course no Heinz Chapel and no Cathedral."

Halbritter and her late husband were great travelers, visiting Europe 13 times, as well as China, Japan, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and Egypt. "We loved to see the world."--Sally Neiser



IN MEMORIAM

Thomas M. Benner (Education '50) of Ford City, Pennsylvania, died on October 18, 1995. His wife, Helen, writes: "We were married for 56 years and had a wonderful life together."

Vera Kost Brandt (Education '34) died on August 16, 1995. Widowed in 1954, she returned to teaching at Pitt, then taught in the North Allegheny School District from 1956-1978 where she coached an undefeated swimming team for five years, a varsity golf team for three years, and tennis team for one. At the time of her retirement, to prove that age is a relative thing, Mrs. Brandt performed a jackknife dive from the high board at the North Allegheny pool, a feat she had promised her students.

Sarah R. Davey (Education '30), a long-time teacher in the Pittsburgh secondary school system, died October 29, 1995. A resident of Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania, she actively participated in the Alumnae Association and supported Pitt throughout her long and distinguished career.

Joseph V. Greco (Arts and Sciences '50, '41), retired professor of Italian language and literature at Pitt, died in May 1995. He founded Pitt's Italian Language Studies program. In 1978, the Italian government awarded him the Commander of the Order of the Star of Solidarity, its highest honor for non-citizens. He retired in 1982.

Katharine Blair Cuthbert Hardee (Medicine '45) died on February 24, 1995, in Florida. Her husband, Pearson, writes, "[My wife] was nationally known for her work in treating alcoholics and others with addictions. Her work was a memorial to her." Dr. Hardee was a senior member of the American Medical Association.

Klaus Hofmann, world-renowned biochemistry professor, died of liver cancer on Christmas Day 1995. Hofmann, who was professor emeritus of experimental medicine and biochemistry, was best known for developing a synthetic version of the hormone known as ACTH. He also did important research into the cause of diabetes.

Memorial donations can be made to the Hofmann Fund/University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, c/o the Development Department, 3708 Fifth Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213.

Frances Statti Nesta (Education '44, '31) died April 4, 1995, at age 88. She chaired the Italian Nationality Room Committee for 23 years and personally sponsored 10 scholarships in memory of the Statti and Nesta families.

Michael Roman (Arts and Sciences '36) died September 27, 1995. For 44 years, he was the editor of the Greek Catholic Union Messenger. In 1946, when the University's Nationality Rooms were dedicated, he was spokesman for the Russian Room. In 1989, Pope John Paul II conferred upon him the title Knight of St. Gregory the Great, the highest honor bestowed on a layperson by the Catholic Church.

Cyril C. Sarver (Education '36, '29) died on September 15, 1995. He had been an educator for 50 years, including 30 years as superintendent of Hampton Township Schools in Allison Park, Pennsylvania.

Rose Tarasi (Public Health '65, Library Science '31, Arts and Sciences '30) died March 25, 1995. She was former administrator of the Angelus Convalescent Center in Pittsburgh.

Pescha Winograd (Education '51) of Forest Hills, Pennsylvania, died in September 1995. She was honored as 1992 Woman of the Year from Hadassah. She was a member of the McKeesport Symphony Board and the National Council of Jewish Women.


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